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Mutular Doric

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Bookmark: http://triarte.brynmawr.edu/objects-1/info/168832



William A. Keely
(active ) Primary



Mutular Doric

January 15, 1893
Ink and watercolor

Sheet
27 3/4 in. x 19 7/8 in. (70.49 cm x 50.48 cm)

Bryn Mawr College
Accession Number: 1993.11
Geography: North and Central America, United States
Classification: Fine and Visual Arts; Drawings
Culture/Nationality: American

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This object has the following keywords:
  • columns - In the discipline of architecture, refers to cylindrical or slightly tapering, vertical members made to either give support or to appear to give support. They usually comprise three sections: base, capital, and shaft. The term also refers to all uprights in steel frame or concrete frame structures. Columns may occasionally stand alone as a monument, for example in Trajan's Column in Rome or Nelson's Column in London. Columns may be used as decorative elements on furniture. For square or rectangular members, either in masonry construction or classically treated, and for massive uprights in Medieval architecture, see "piers (supporting elements)"; for wooden square uprights, see "posts." In the discipline of architecture, refers to cylindrical or slightly tapering, vertical members made to either give support or to appear to give support. They usually comprise three sections: base, capital, and shaft. The term also refers to all uprights in steel frame or concrete frame structures. Columns may occasionally stand alone as a monument, for example in Trajan's Column in Rome or Nelson's Column in London. Columns may be used as decorative elements on furniture. For square or rectangular members, either in masonry construction or classically treated, and for massive uprights in Medieval architecture, see "piers (supporting elements)"; for wooden square uprights, see "posts."
  • Doric - Refers to the architectural style associated with the first of both the three Greek architectural orders and the later five traditional classical orders of architecture that, with Ionic, Corinthian, Tuscan, and Composite, was used by the Romans and through the Renaissance and beyond. It may have origins in wooden Bronze Age structures, and stone versions of the style developed on mainland Greece, probably in Dorian Corinth and other cities such as Athens, in the eighth and seventh centuries BCE. In ancient Greek architecture, it is characterized by a simple form and imposing scale, an undecorated abacus and echinus, columns with no base or pedestal and shafts with twenty shallow flutes, and an entablature with three elements, a plain architrave, a frieze composed of alternate triglyphs and metopes, and a strongly projecting cornice. The Roman and later adaptations often display modifications of the strict Greek rules and may include some decoration and a base for the columns. For the assemblage forming associated columns, use "Doric order."

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Dimensions
  • Sheet Dimensions: 27 3/4 x 19 7/8 in. (70.485 x 50.483 cm)

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<ref name=BMC>cite web |url=http://triarte.brynmawr.edu/objects-1/info/168832 |title=Mutular Doric |author=Bryn Mawr College Library Special Collections |accessdate=5/28/2022 |publisher=Bryn Mawr College</ref>

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