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Image of Classical or Hellenistic Drachma of Eretria

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Bookmark: http://triarte.brynmawr.edu/objects-1/info/160532





Classical or Hellenistic Drachma of Eretria

ca. 357 BCE-267 BCE
Silver

1/2 in. x 7/16 in. x 1/8 in. (1.2 cm x 1.15 cm x 0.3 cm)

Bryn Mawr College
Accession Number: C.1866
Other Number(s): 1950.17 (Long No.)
Geography: Europe, Greece, Eretria
Classification: Exchange Media; Coins
Culture/Nationality: Greek
Collection: Charlotte Rider Long Collection

Keywords Click a term to view the records with the same keyword
This object has the following keywords:
  • Animalia - Kingdom containing multicellular organisms having cells bound by a plasma membrane and organized into tissue and specialized tissue systems that permit them to either move about in search of food or to draw food toward themselves. Unable to make their own food within themselves, as photosynthetic plants do, they rely on consuming preformed food. They possess a nervous system with sensory and motor nerves, enabling them to receive environmental stimuli and to respond with specialized movements.
  • bulls - Adult males of cattle, oxen, bison, camel, moose, walrus, whale, seal, rhinoceros, hippopotamus, giraffe, elephant, dolphin, and other animals.
  • Classical - Refers to an ancient Greek style and period that begins around 480 BCE, when the Greek city-states defeated the Persian invaders, and ends around 323 BCE, with the death of Alexander the Great. It is characterized by the rebuilding of cities after the Persian wars, the flourishing of philosophy, drama, architecture, sculpture, painting, and the other arts. In the visual arts, it is known for the mastery of the human form and sophistication of architectural design.
  • drachmas - Small, silver Greek coins originally equivalent to six obols and issued from the 6th century BCE; usage continued by the Parthians and Sassanians until the 7th century CE.
  • female - Referring to the sex that normally produces eggs or female germ cells.
  • Hellenistic - Refers to the ancient Greek period, culture, and art of ancient Greece that lasted from about 330 BCE to 31 BCE, when Augustus defeated Cleopatra and Mark Antony. It is characterized by an international culture that was ushered in by Alexander the Great's conquest of India, Egypt, and the Near East. In architecture and art, the style is marked by greater sophistication, complexity, and diversity than was known in earlier Greek styles. Architecture diverges from strict rules of earlier periods. Sculptors emphasized more realistic figures in a greater variety of poses than in earlier Greek art.
  • lyres - Chordophones with strings attached to a yoke, consisting of two arms and a crossbar, that lies in the same plane as the soundbox.
  • Nymphs - Nymphs are minor goddesses usually associated with local geographic features like forests or rivers and the god Pan. Added June 2010 by M. Weldon
  • silver - Pure metallic element having symbol Ag and atomic number 47; a malleable, ductile, white metal with characteristic sheen, considered a precious metal. Silver is widely distributed throughout the world, occurring rarely as metallic silver (in Peru, Norway) but more often as silver-gold alloys and silver ore. Today silver is obtained as a byproduct in the refinement of gold, lead, copper, or zinc ores. Silver was smelted from the ore galena as early as 3800 BCE. As a pure metal, silver is second to gold in malleability and ductility, can be polished to a highly reflective surface, and used -- typically in an alloy -- in jewelry, coinage, photography, mirrors, electrical contacts, and tableware.
  • Strigiformes - Order containing around 180 species in two families of nocturnal raptorial birds with hooked beaks, strong talons, and soft plumage. All owls have the same general appearance, which is characterized by a flat face, small hooked beak, short tail, round wings, and large, forward-facing eyes. The bird became associated with Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom and also owls became symbolic of intelligence because it was thought that they could forsee events. Also, because of their nocturnal existence and hooting sounds, owls have also been symbols associated with the occult. In the Middle Ages, the owl became a symbol of the darkness before the coming of Christ.

Additional Images Click an image to view a larger version
Additional Image C.1866_BMC_f_2.jpg
C.1866_BMC_f_2.jpg
Additional Image C.1866_BMC_r.jpg
C.1866_BMC_r.jpg

If you would like to cite this object in a Wikipedia article please use the following template:

<ref name=BMC>cite web |url=http://triarte.brynmawr.edu/objects-1/info/160532 |title=Classical or Hellenistic Drachma of Eretria |author=Bryn Mawr College Library Special Collections |accessdate=11/29/2022 |publisher=Bryn Mawr College</ref>

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