{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 150888, "URL" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Objects-1/info/150888", "Disp_Access_No" : "68.E1.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Fan (Ili)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "", "Sort_Artist" : "", "Disp_Dimen" : "12 1/2 in. x 10 in. (31.75 cm x 25.4 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "12 1/2 in.", "Disp_Width" : "10 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Fiber", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Fiber", "Info_Page_Comm" : "This is a spatulate fan which is locally called an ili. This is considered to be the simplest and easiest type of item to weave. Young girls who are just beginning their weaving apprenticeships often make this type of fan. The foundation fiber is made from the midrib of coconut leaflets, and this is then interwoven with the sections split from each side of the same leaflets which are seperated into two layers, boiled, scraped, and bleached in the sun. The colored fiber is processed pandanus. This ili has purple fibers woven across the center of the fan as decoration.", "Dedication" : "Gift of Judith Weber Huntsman, Class of 1957, PhD 1969", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "Polynesian", "Creation_Place2" : "Tokelau", "Department" : "Anthropology", "Obj_Name" : "fan", "Period" : "", "Style" : "Western Polynesia", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/images/68.E1.16_BMC_f.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/Thumbnails/68.E1.16_BMC_f.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/Previews/68.E1.16_BMC_f.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/68.E1.16_BMC_f.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6655", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }