{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 174167, "URL" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Objects-1/info/174167", "Disp_Access_No" : "W.196", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1906", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1906", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1906", "Disp_Title" : "Grand Canyon", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Lockwood de Forest", "Sort_Artist" : "de Forest, Lockwood", "Disp_Dimen" : "9 5/8 in. x 14 in. (24.45 cm x 35.56 cm)", "Disp_Height" : "9 5/8 in.", "Disp_Width" : "14 in.", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Oil on masonite", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on masonite", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From the Centennial Exhibition in 1985: LOCKWOOD DE FOREST, PAINTER. American 1850-1932. Third generation, Hudson River School. Oil sketch, Grand CanĂ¿on. One of five views. Oil on cardboard, in original gilt frame. 1906. Lockwood De Forest painted this outdoors at the Canyon rim on the first of three trips he made to this area. Despite his other interests, Mr. De Forest considered himself foremost a painter. He sketched with Frederic Edwin Church in Europe and the Catskills as a young man, and formally studied with landscape painters Hermann Corrodi in Rome and James McDougall Hart, R.A. in the early 1870's. His subjects encompass scenes in New England, Long Island, the Mediterranean and Near East, the Southwest U.S., Alaska, California and Mexico. He preferred coastal scenery or desert scenery, by sunrise, sunset or moonlight. Showing his aversion to foregrounds, his horizons are low, the views are filled with sky. He took photographs with one of the earliest Kodak cameras on his first Near Eastern trip. Photography influenced his approach, as he tried to achieve objective effects. His works show the anonymity of the artist-craftsman. His later works become unintentionally more abstract with broader brushwork. His oil sketch size was almost always 9-3/4 x 14 inch because this size permitted accurate perceptions of the picture plane at arm's length from the eye. He used a drawing device in the 1920's which was a form of "camera obscura." His larger paintings were done in the studio. He exhibited at major expositions in Europe and the United States. He was elected to the National Academy of Design in 1891.", "Dedication" : "Bequest of M. Carey Thomas, President of Bryn Mawr College, 1894-1922", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "American", "Creation_Place2" : "United States", "Department" : "Fine Arts", "Obj_Name" : "painting", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Related_Sibling" : [ { "Rel_Obj_ID" : "174164", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Palm Springs" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "174165", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Palm Springs" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "174166", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Palm Springs" },{ "Rel_Obj_ID" : "174168", "Rel_Obj_Title" : "Grand Canyon" } ], "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/images/W.196_BMC_f_2.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/Thumbnails/W.196_BMC_f_2.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/Previews/W.196_BMC_f_2.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/W.196_BMC_f_2.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "24331", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }