{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 189675, "URL" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Objects-1/info/189675", "Disp_Access_No" : "W.146", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "pre-1917", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "", "_Disp_End_Date" : "", "Disp_Title" : "Chinese Cloisonné Table Lamp", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Unknown Artist", "Sort_Artist" : "Artist, Unknown", "Disp_Dimen" : " ()", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Cloissone enamel", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Cloissone enamel", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1917 inventory, Sitting Room (p. 50): Pair cloisonne bottle vases. Tapering oviform bowl with scattered flowers on vermiculated turquoise ground. Shoulder band of white with bright flowers. Tubular neck of blue. Flattened stoppers with ball knob. 9 3/4" high. Small vase-shaped lamp with wide-flaring lip. Decorated with vegetal and floral designs in cloisonné technique with blue, white, red, yellow, and green enamel. From center of vase, a small stand holds the bulb and lamp shade. In cloisonné decoration, small metal wires are soldered to a metal object creating compartments (cloisons in French), which are then filled with different colors of enamel. Cloisonné decoration in China began around the 13th or 14th century and became extremely popular and elaborate in the 15th century under the Ming dynasty. The mid-19th century saw increased interest in and inspiration from Chinese art, which can be connected with the shift in economic and political relations between America and China. American and European access to highly desirable Chinese goods were restricted in the early 19th century, as the Western demand for Chinese goods far outweighed the Chinese interest in Western ones. The unequal balance erupted in the Opium Wars of 1839-1842 and 1856-1860.The treaties signed at the end of the Second Opium War opened trade relations between China and America, England, and France. The influx of Chinese goods after the treaty exposed American artists to Chinese art and design. ", "Dedication" : "Bequest of M. Carey Thomas, President of Bryn Mawr College, 1894-1922", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "", "Creation_Place2" : "", "Department" : "Fine Arts", "Obj_Name" : "lamp", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/images/W.146_BMC_f_3.jpg", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/Thumbnails/W.146_BMC_f_3.jpg", "PreviewPath" : "https://triarte.brynmawr.edu/Media/Previews/W.146_BMC_f_3.jpg", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/W.146_BMC_f_3.jpg", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "110258", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }